Therapy Process

What happens in my first therapy session?

Is not knowing exactly what happens in your first counselling session causing some anxiety?  Is fear keeping you from making an appointment because of uncertainty?

I’m here to assure you that although the first session can cause some rattled nerves there is nothing to be afraid of.  Fear of the unknown is valid and experienced by many people.

During the first session with my clients, there is an intake process.  You will fill out some paperwork that involves consent to participate in therapy and a confidentiality agreement.  After you read and sign it, I check in with you to see if you have any questions.  If you’re not familiar with my therapeutic approach then I tell you about how I like to work with clients.  Then we move on to some questions about your medical background, current habits, concerning symptoms, and the reason you are seeking therapy.

This process can fill up the entire first session.  It’s one of the most important sessions because we are getting to know each other.  You’re deciding if I’m a good fit for your counselling needs and I am assessing if I can meet those needs.  As a clinical counsellor I will absolutely refer clients to another practitioner if that is what the client requests or if the client’s needs are outside of my scope of practice.  It would be unethical not to do so.

As a client, it’s important to feel comfortable and safe with your counsellor.  A strong therapeutic relationship is essential to successful therapy outcomes.  If you feel like you don’t trust or respect your counsellor, then the therapy process will not work.  You also must feel safe with your counsellor and feel like you can open up to them without the fear of being judged.

The first session is just the beginning to building a strong foundation for your healing process and it vital to find a counsellor that you can connect with.  The first counsellor you meet may not be a good fit for you, or even the second or third, so take your time in finding a counsellor who will hold space for you in the way you need them to.

connection-new

So consider the first session as a ‘getting to know each other’ session.  Depending on the client’s needs, goals may be talked about as well as some treatment planning and resources.  But mostly it’s an introduction session.  If a client has been in therapy before or is in crisis, then this linear process may look a lot different.

No matter what, as a counsellor I believe it’s important to meet you where you are and then proceed from there.

See, not too scary, right?

I usually have light refreshments in my office as well so there’s that. 😊

And of course, there’s the art therapy piece of what I do but I’ll save that for my next post.


 

*Heather Hassenbein is a Registered Clinical Counsellor and Professional Art Therapist located in Vancouver, BC.

Art Therapy

What is art therapy? Why should I try it?

Art Therapy is a therapeutic modality that involves an art therapist and client working with the creative art making process to support a client’s physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual well-being.  Working with the creative process allows people to reach deeper levels of healing that talk therapy alone cannot always do.

If you have trouble expressing yourself verbally or find yourself unable to describe your experience with words, then working with art can help you express yourself without the use of words.  Studies have shown how trauma impacts the verbal language area of the brain making it difficult to use or even find the right words to effectively verbalize traumatic events.  The ability to use images and symbols can facilitate healing when words fail.  Creating art can also feel like a safer way to express yourself which also ignites the healing process.  Visual and symbolic expression can empower individuals and help develop self-awareness, explore emotions, address unresolved emotional conflicts, improve social skills, and raise self-esteem.

art enables

You do not have to be an artist to engage in art therapy.  This is a common concern and fear of many people who are not familiar with art therapy.  You do not need to know how to draw or paint or do anything.  You are not responsible for creating a great masterpiece.  Art therapy focuses on the creative process itself.  It is about what is coming up for you while you are creating.  As an art therapist I will not be judging or critiquing your art.  I am with you to support your process and make sure you feel safe.

Many clients choose to create a variety of pieces.  Some clients like to paint pictures while others like to experiment with mixing paint colors.  A few clients may roll balls of clay with their hands while others create pinch pots or clay animals.  There are clients who like to draw cartoons while other clients just like to scribble on a page or two.  As individual needs are different so is the creative process to each client.  Your “art” is whatever you create it to be and that is okay.

As an art therapist I focus on a client’s strengths, interests, and abilities so engaging in the creative process feels safe and comfortable.  Art expression includes drawing, painting, sculpting, clay, writing, collage, poetry, music, and much more.  Research supports the use of art therapy and acknowledges the therapeutic benefits gained through artistic self-expression.

It is always the client’s choice to engage in art therapy or not.  It is okay to start at anytime and it is okay to stop at anytime.

Benefits of Art Therapy

• Promotes self-expression and self-awareness
• Supports self-care, balance, and well being
• Decreases stress, depression, and anxiety
• Manages chronic pain and physical ailments causing distress
• Encourages the development of healthy and effective coping skills
• Explores traumatic experiences in a safe manner
• Assists in improving focus and memory
• Develops problem solving skills and interpersonal/social skills

 

okeefe

 

 

*Heather Hassenbein is a Registered Clinical Counsellor and Professional Art Therapist located in Vancouver, BC.